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Light BULBS and lights

This version was saved 12 years, 3 months ago View current version     Page history
Saved by PBworks
on June 25, 2008 at 4:37:27 pm
 
 

Headlight

The headlight uses an H4 bulb.  Many riders are using the brighter Sylvania Silverstar H4ST model. The ST indicates it's for motorcycles so it'll handle the vibration better.  Most of the autoparts stores will not have this ST model.  See the Sylvania bulbs site for more info.
 

Headlight Modulator

A headlight modulator makes the headlight appear to flicker and will increase your visibility considerably.  They are legal in all 50 states but are required to be turned off at night.  Any decent unit will include a light sensor that will automatically determine when it's light enough to enable the modulation.
 

Kisan Pathblaser

One of the more popular brands is the Kisan Pathblazer P115W.  This unit is simple to install and modulates the high beam only.  You can disable the modulation anytime by just switching to low beam and then back to high beam quickly.  To install, you simply remove the headlight and this unit goes between the bulb and the wiring.  It literally plugs onto the back of the bulb and then has a wiring extension that plugs into the existing wiring connector.  No wiring modifications are necessary!  Lastly, you need to plug in the light sensor and run it outside of the headlight bucket so that it points skyward.  If you don't plug in the light sensor, the unit won't work (won't modulate).  This particular unit is also failsafe so that if it fails, it reverts to your standard output (no modulation).

 

 

Modify the Rear Turn Signals to Accept Dual Filament Bulbs

 
Go to Auto Zone and buy 2 each of the #85803 Double Contact ¾” Sockets and a pair of #1157 bulbs. You’ll spend about $9.00.
 
Remove the turn signal lights by following these steps.
1)     Remove the cover in the center, just above the tail light.
2)     Unscrew the nut holding the turn signal assembly in.
3)     Cut the two wires. Cut close to the assembly so you leave enough wire.
4)     Remove the entire turn signal light assembly.
5)     There’s a small Phillips screw inside the hole where the wires come out. Remove that screw and separate the mount from the light.
6)     Remove the clear lens.
7)     Remove the bulb (press in and twist CCW to remove it).
8)     Remove the 2 screws holding the reflector assembly.
9)     Remove the reflector assembly along with the two wires.
 
Looking at the reflector you’ll notice that the lamp socket appears to be a press fit. Actually, there is a spot weld on each side.
They look like tiny circles. Carefully center punch in the center of each of those circles.
Starting with about a 1/16” drill bit, and working up to about 1/8” or 3/16” bit, drill out the spot welds.
You can then push the socket out of the reflector.
 
Hooray! The new AZ sockets are a press fit into the reflector.
Before you put them in, remove the black plastic assembly with the wires in it.
Now, go ahead and press them in.
 
These sockets need a ground and we’ll not get it from the plastic light body.
That means you have to solder a wire onto the socket.
The socket will not accept solder as is. You’ll need to use a file or grinder to rough up the surface.
I roughed up the socket right where it sticks out of the reflector, and also roughed up the reflector where the two meet.
 
Cut a wire to about the same length and size as the two that came in the socket.
Using a fairly high heat or high wattage iron AND RESIN CORE SOLDER, solder the wire to the socket.
If you solder in just the right place, it will also solder the socket to the reflector.
Once it cools (yes, it’s still hot!) wrap a layer or two of electrical tape around the socket to keep the wire from flexing and breaking loose.
 
It’s now time to put it all back together. Go get a beer or Coke and relax a minute.
1)     Put the black plastic piece with the wires in it back into the socket.
2)     Remove the small rubber grommet with 2 holes in it in the bottom of the tail light assembly.
3)     Look inside the new socket and you’ll see a groove on each side of the socket. One is deeper than the other.
4)     Plug the 1157 bulb into the socket making sure the bottom tit on the bulb goes into the deeper groove. Press it in and turn CW to lock it in.
5)     Feed the 3 wires through the hole where the grommet was and seat the reflector in the turn light. Replace the 2 screws holding the reflector in.
6)     Feed the 3 wires into the mount. They go through the hole that has the small screw in it.
7)     Replace the small screw and tighten. The assembly is now complete.
 
Now we have to determine which wire is which.
You should know (you did mark it or use a different color, didn’t you?) which wire is the ground wire.
Connect the ground wire to the negative terminal of a 12 volt source. The bike battery or your car battery will work fine.
Connect each of the other wires, one at a time, to the positive battery terminal.
One wire will light the light brighter than the other. That wire will be for the turn signal. Mark it somehow.
The other wire will be a running light just like your tail light.
 
You can now reinstall the complete assembly on the bike.
Connect the new ground wire to the ground wire that you cut off (the black one).
Or, you could get a crimp terminal lug with a hole big enough to fit over the mounting bolt and connect the ground wire that way.
 
The wire that you marked as the brightest gets connected to the other cut off wire, either red or green, depending on which side you’re working on.
The other wire from our new bulb needs to be connected to the tail light.
You have to connect to the blue wire with the red marks.
That wire is also inside the assembly. (The “running” light wires from both new bulbs get connected to that blue/red wire).
You could just leave the running light wires dangling for now if you don’t want to connect them. 
You can finish the job later..
 
Tint the clear lenses red or install red 1157 bulbs.
Reinstall the lenses
Replace the center cover.
Test your work
 
 

How to Make your Clear Lenses Red

 
There are at least two ways to make the clear turn signal lenses red.
1) Go to hobby store and buy a can of Testors Translucent Red spray paint. Remove the lenses and spray the INSIDE with the paint.
2) Buy a roll of brake light repair tape (red) at your local automotive store. Cover the inside of the lens with the tape. It works well!
 
 

Run/Turn/Brake Tail Light Converter

 
Would you like your turn signals to be Run lights, Brake lights, and Turn Signal lights instead of only turn signals?
Well, you could pay $100 or so and buy a converter from Kuryakyn or others.
Then buy those expensive red bulbs that fit the turn signal sockets. There IS an alternative, though.
 
Visit your local automotive store (or Wal-Mart) and buy a Hopkins #48845 Trailer Light Adapter. They’re about $15.00 to $20.00.
 
The first thing you’ll need to do is replace the stock turn signal sockets and bulbs and wiring as described above.
 
Next, remove the driver’s seat from the bike.
On the left side between the battery box and the frame you’ll see several wires all wrapped together in a bundle.
These wires go to the lights on the rear fender.
Follow them to the rear to be certain you have the correct bundle.
They also go down behind the cover that has the seat lock on it.
You will have to connect to those wires somewhere. If you decide to connect behind the panel, you’ll need a safety TORX bit that will fit the security screw.
It’s probably easier to just unwrap the wires where they exit the frame and go to the rear.
 
The Hopkins (some call it Hoppy) converter can be left loose under the seat anywhere it’s convenient for you or you could fasten it to something.
If you remove the tool kit on top of the battery and put it in a saddle bag, the Hoppy could mount where the tool kit was.
What’s important is how to wire the Hoppy. Refer to the pictures for detail.
 
 
 
What we’re going to do now is cut the wires going to the rear turn signals and insert the Hoppy in series.
We’ll also tap into the brake light wire and connect it to the Hoppy.
Here’s how the wiring will look when it’s completed.
 
 
 
 
It’s unfortunate that Yamaha did not choose to use standard colors for the wires.
The picture illustrates the Yamaha colors and the Hoppy’s (standard) wire colors.
I hope the swapping of the red and yellow wires doesn’t cause any undue confusion.
 
The Hoppy has five wires on one side (the input side) and four on the other side (the output side).
We do not need the brown wires at all and you can either cut them off or secure them somewhere.
The two white wires are ground and should be connected to the bike’s frame or to the negative battery terminal.
The remaining five wires are the wires we need to connect.
 
If you ignore the brake wires, it becomes apparent that all we’re doing is inserting the Hoppy in series with the wires going to the rear turn signals.
Here are the steps required.
 
First, we’ll connect the brake wire since it’s easier.
1)     Unwrap the wire bundle until you have 2”-3” of wire exposed.
2)     Locate the Yellow brake wire.
3)     Strip about 1/8” of insulation off the yellow wire.
4)     Cut the Red Hoppy wire to length to reach the Yellow wire, strip about ½” of insulation from the end and wrap it around the Yellow wire where you removed the insulation.
5)     Solder, with RESIN CORE solder, the wires together. Put a turn or two of electrical tape around the connection but not around the entire bundle.
 
Now we’re ready to put the Hoppy in series with the turn signals.
1)     Locate the Green wire that goes toward the rear fender and cut it.
2)     Strip about ½” of insulation off each end.
3)     Cut the Green INPUT wire from the Hoppy to length, strip ½” of insulation and twist it together with the end of the cut green wire that goes toward the front of the bike.
         Solder the wires and wrap a turn or two of tape around them.
         Alternatively, you could have slipped a 1” piece of shrink sleeving over one of the wires before you twisted them together.
        Then, after soldering, slide the sleeving over the solder joint and shrink it with a match, lighter, soldering iron, etc.
4)     Cut the Green OUTPUT wire from the Hoppy to length, strip ½” of insulation and twist it together with the end of the cut green wire that goes toward the rear of the bike.
         Solder the wires and wrap a turn or two of tape around them.
         Alternatively, you could have slipped a 1” piece of shrink sleeving over one of the wires before you twisted them together.
         Then, after soldering, slide the sleeving over the solder joint and shrink it with a match, lighter, soldering iron, etc.
5)     Locate the Red wire that goes toward the rear fender and cut it.
6)     Strip about ½” of insulation off each end.
7)     Cut the Yellow INPUT wire from the Hoppy to length, strip ½” of insulation and twist it together with the end of the cut red wire that goes toward the front of the bike.
         Solder the wires and wrap a turn or two of tape around them.
         Alternatively, you could have slipped a 1” piece of shrink sleeving over one of the wires before you twisted them together.
        Then, after soldering, slide the sleeving over the solder joint and shrink it with a match, lighter, soldering iron, etc.
8)    Cut the Yellow OUTPUT wire from the Hoppy to length, strip ½” of insulation and twist it together with the end of the cut red wire that goes toward the rear of the bike.
        Solder the wires and wrap a turn or two of tape around them.
        Alternatively, you could have slipped a 1” piece of shrink sleeving over one of the wires before you twisted them together.
        Then, after soldering, slide the sleeving over the solder joint and shrink it with a match, lighter, soldering iron, etc.
9)    Turn on the bike’s ignition and verify that both turn signal lights are on (the dim filaments) and the main tail light and license lights are also on.
10)  Signal a left turn and verify the front and rear left turn signals blink (the brighter filament).
11)  Signal a right turn and verify the front and rear right turn signals blink (the brighter filament).
12)  Apply ythe brakes and verify both turn signals light on the bright filament and the big brake light also lights.
13)  If there were any problems with the functionality of the lights, check your connections and your soldering.
14)  When all is well, wrap all the wiring back into a bundle and tuck it away.
15)  Replace the seat and go ride with confidence that you’re now more visible than before.

 

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